My first book finished this year.

(Yes I did begin it the end of last year but hey! I’m done now and I’m counting it.)

Happy New Year everyone. I won’t even mention our previous year. I know how everyone feels about it. Moving forward….

I just finished listening to almost 20 hours of a travel book by Alastair Humphreys. It is described as:

At the age of 24, Alastair Humphreys set off to try to cycle round the world. By the time he arrived back home, four years later, he had ridden 46,000 miles (74.000kms). across five continents on a budget of just £7,000. 

From frozen Siberia tundra to the jungles of central Africa, Alastair recounts his extraordinary adventures in two parts – Moods of Future Joys and Thunder & Sunshine – brought together in audiobook for the first time. 

Alastair lives in the U.K. He had finished university, had a young woman he loved but he was restless. He didn’t want an office job though he had very lucrative offers with secure employment guaranteed. He decided to take his 7000 pounds and ride around the world. It was the summer of 2001. He had no mobile phone, gps or any of the other technology we use so readily these days. His plan was to go from the UK to Europe, eastward through Iran, Afghanistan, to Asia, Japan, Australia, South America, the United States. He planned on being away for four years.

However, after he started out 9/11 happened in the U.S.A. and once he arrived in Turkey he was advised to not go through Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan. Instead he went to northern Africa, beginning in Egypt and south to Cape Town, South Africa along the western African coast. From there he went to Patagonia in South America and rode north to Alaska. He then rode through Japan, Russia and westward back to Europe.

He lived on bread and jam and spent next to nothing. This is his story of hardship, severe loneliness (lots of tears), contrasting poverty and wealth, beauty and ugliness in the surrounding areas. He learned a lot and realised how privileged his life was. I’m glad I listened to the audible version as I find first person travel books the most enjoyable in this format.

It took me awhile to warm to him. The first couple of hours he carried on ad nauseum about his crying jags, missing his girlfriend, how out of shape he was, how he didn’t know why he was doing this. He hated it, he wanted to go home.

I almost gave up but still had about 17 hours to go. As I couldn’t sleep one night I set the timer on audible for 30 minutes hoping I would fall asleep. Once he took the focus off his emotional needs and began realising where he was and how much he was enjoying himself, in spite of his reservations it picked up.

To get from one continent to another he bummed rides on yachts and container ships. He was very tenacious and embraced the people no matter where he was. Some of the accommodation he stayed in made my hair curl. Filth, overflowing squat toilets, bedbugs. He rode across Siberia in the winter in deep snow. I don’t know how he managed it but he did. He had friends that flew in to various places and rode with him in certain places and then they would leave.

I have read a lot of travel writing and I think this must be the most arduous trip I have been on vicariously with anyone. But he did it. He finished when everyone said he wouldn’t. I won’t say anymore than that.

He was a good narrator and I really enjoyed his descriptions of the families he stayed with, the places he slept, ate and visited. Little snippets of history popped up here and there but not enough to make me yawn. I don’t read travel writing for extensive history. Instead I want to hear about the day to day logistics of what one does, eats and who they meet. This did not let me down.

It is the closest I can get at the moment of travelling myself.

Now going into 2021 I think I’ve had enough travel writing for awhile. This book wore me out and I’m looking foward to getting into some other books and activities. More on that soon.

I have been reading other books, mainly dipping in and out of several but more on that another time.

All the best for 2021 and I look forward to seeing what everyone gets up to this year with their books,challenges, lives. Stay well and maybe we’ll all get back to normal before too long.

Always the optimist !!

Author: TravellinPenguin

I live a retired life in Tasmania, Australia. I love books, travel, animals, photography, motor biking and good friends. I indulge in all these activities with the little Travellin' Penguin who has now shared five continents with me. We love book shops, photography walks and time with friends as all our family is in USA and Canada. I enjoy visitors to my blog so hope you'll stop by.

16 thoughts on “My first book finished this year.”

  1. This wasn’t only an extremely arduous journey, it was highly risky – travelling through Africa as he did took him through some very volatile regions and as a sole traveller he would have been more vulnerable.
    How did he manage to cycle that much just on bread and jam – that wouldn’t have given him the calorific content for the amount of energy he’d be burning up. I’m assuming that sometimes he managed a bit better than that?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. His diet was appalling. I could not believe the junk he would eat as long as it was cheap. However many villagers did feed him quite often and once in Asia he could afford better food. He took extreme risks with where he went but only got robbed once in Russia. Was quite safe in the rest of the world. Though children often threw rocks at him as he travelled through Africa just for fun. I think mosquitoes were some of his biggest enemies.

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        1. I agree. I was surprised he rode down the west coast and not through Kenya and some of the safer countries. He wrote he had done absolutely no research on Africa and I shuddered when I read that. 🐧🌷

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  2. I enjoy travel books and I enjoyed your review. I don’t use audio books, am keeping that in reserve for when my eyes cease to co-operate, so won’t be listening to/reading this one.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I’m glad he didn’t make it to Australia, there are enough idiots on pushbikes crossing the Nullarbor already. But. I had a daughter in Central America at 9/11 – took ages to work out a way home. And, my sister in law (Milly’s sister) road the whole west coast of North America, years ago now, was routinely taken home by people she met, and wrote not a word about it that I have ever seen.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. i wrote 3 posts on these books last year; i was exhausted after reading them as well… i just don’t know how he managed to keep going like he did… getting robbed in Russia was pretty exciting even though he didn’t go on about it…

    Liked by 2 people

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